<$BlogRSDURL$>
Apple Mac OS X FAQ
Thursday, June 20, 2002
 
Starting FileMaker Server 5.5 During System Startup On Mac OS X
Starting FileMaker Server 5.5 During System Startup On Mac OS X

The current documentation for FileMaker Server 5.5 on Mac OS X does not provide a method for launching the application automatically when the system is starting up. This article provides a description of how this can easily be accomplished.
On Mac OS X, system services are activated at system startup by a series of scripts residing in the /System/ Library/StartupItems folder.
Each service has it’s own folder containing two or more files. One of these files, a Bourne Shell script which starts the service, has the same name as the folder in which it resides (i.e. the sendmail start up script is called Sendmail and is in the folder /System/Library/StartupItems/Sendmail) and the second is a parameter list file which contains information about other services this service is dependent on. For the FileMaker Server 5.5 we need only create the FileMakerServer folder and these two files.
To proceed with this article you must have Mac OS X Administrator level knowledge that includes complete understanding of administrative functions such as:
• Parameter lists
• Shell scripts
• Setting permissions
• Modifying the Hostconfig file
Note: The following instructions assume that FileMaker Server 5.5 is installed in the default directory and that you are not logged in as root. Although you are not logged in as root, in places where you use the "sudo" command you are making a one-time request for administrative privileges. Throughout this process when entering this command you may be prompted for a password. If you see "Password:" on screen, enter your root password, and press the enter key. When typing, your entered password will not display on screen.
A. Creating the FileMakerServer Startup Folder and Script
Open the Terminal application (found in /Applications/Utilities) you will see the following line on your screen:
[localhost:~] name% (where name is your login name, for example admin%)
1. To move to the start up items folder at the prompt enter the following command then press the return key:
cd /System/Library/StartupItems/
Result on screen: [localhost:/System/Library/StartupItems] name%
2. Create a startup folder for FileMaker Server 5.5. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo mkdir FileMakerServer
3. Move to the new FileMaker Server 5.5 startup items folder. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
cd FileMakerServer/
Result on screen: [localhost:Library/StartupItems/FileMakerServer] name%
4. Create the parameter list file. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo pico StartupParameters.plist
Result on screen: The Pico text editor opens.
5. Paste the following text into the editor window, include the first and last brackets.
{
Description = "FileMaker Server 5.5";
Provides = ("FMP");
Requires = ("Resolver");
Uses = ("Network Time", "NFS");
Preference = "None";
Messages =
{
start = "FileMaker Server 5.5";
stop = "FileMaker Server 5.5";
};
}
6. Press Control-O and then return, to write out to the file and save, then enter Control-X to exit the editor.
Result on screen: The screen will show [ wrote 12 lines]
[localhost:Library/StartupItems/FileMakerServer] name%
7. At the prompt create the FileMaker Server 5.5 start up script. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo pico FileMakerServer
Result on screen: The Pico text editor opens.
8. Paste the following text into the editor window, include the first number sign (#) at the beginning and "fi" at the end.
#!/bin/sh
. /etc/rc.common
##
# Start FileMaker Server
##
FMS_PATH="/Applications/FileMaker Server 5.5/FileMaker Server Config.app/Contents/Resources/"
if [ "${FMSERVER:=-NO-}" = "-YES-" ]; then
ConsoleMessage "Starting FileMaker Server"
"$FMS_PATH""fmserverd" start -c "$FMS_PATH""fmserver.conf"
fi
9. Press Control-O and then return key, to write out and save to the file, then enter Control-X to exit the editor.
Result on screen: The screen will show [ wrote 10 lines]
[localhost:Library/StartupItems/FileMakerServer] name%
10. At the prompt set execute permissions for the start up script. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo chmod 0555 FileMakerServer
Result on screen: [localhost:Library/StartupItems/FileMakerServer] name%
B. Enabling The Startup Script
During the start up process the hostconfig file located at /etc/hostconfig is consulted to see which services should be started. To enable the start up script we have just created, a line must be added to this file for FileMaker Server 5.5.
1. At the prompt open the file /etc/hostconfig. To do this, enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo pico /etc/hostconfig
Result on screen: The Hostconfig file is opened in the Pico editor.
2. Locate section labeled, "# Services" and add a line containing only
FMSERVER=-YES-
Note: To bypass FileMaker Server 5.5 during system startup change YES to NO. For example: FMSERVER=-NO-
3. Press Control-O and then return, to save the file, then enter Control-X to exit the editor.
C. Checking That It Works
On Mac OS X FileMaker Server 5.5 runs as a daemon and as such has no interface. Once the steps in this article are completed and your machine is restarted you will NOT see a FileMaker Server icon in the Dock.
Why is this? When clicking on the FileMaker Server Config app in the FileMaker Server 5.5 folder you are actually launching the configuration app and not the FileMaker Server Service. The configuration application does display an icon. When following the steps in this article you are only starting the FileMaker Server 5.5 Service and not the FileMaker Server configuration application, thus no icon will appear.
There are several ways you can test your work to see if it is working:
• Without restarting
1. Launch the FileMaker Server Config application and make sure FileMaker Server is not running.
2. To check that the start up script is working correctly, from the Terminal application enter the following command then press the return key:
sudo /System/Library/StartupItems/FileMakerServer/FileMakerServer
The following message should appear in the Terminal:
Starting FileMaker Server
• With Restarting
1. From the Apple Menu choose Restart, while the machine is restarting watch the Mac OS X Boot screen just below the progress bar. You will should eventually see FileMaker Server 5.5 listed.
• Using a second machine with FileMaker Pro 5.5 client installed.
1. Make sure you have a multi-user file in the root of the FileMaker Server 5.5 folder.
2. Restart the FileMaker Server 5.5 machine.
3. From another machine on your network, launch FileMaker Pro 5.5 and click the host button. If you see your FileMaker Server machine in the list then it worked.
D. Disable Automatic Startup
Remember, to disable the automatic startup of FileMaker Server 5.5, once you have completed the above, you can change the parameter in the hostconfig file from:
FMSERVER=-YES-
to
FMSERVER=-NO-


 
Mac OS X Server: About SMTP Authentication for Apple Mail Server

Mac OS X Server: About SMTP Authentication for Apple Mail Server


Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 or later offers an SMTP Authentication ("SMTP AUTH") feature for the Apple Mail Server. This allows you to accept SMTP traffic only from authenticated clients.

SMTP AUTH allows an SMTP client to authenticate with a name and password when sending mail, thus allowing you to restrict who can send SMTP traffic to your server (whether for relay or local delivery).

Points to remember:

• If SMTP AUTH is enabled but Restricted SMTP Relay is not, then all SMTP connections must authenticate before any mail will be accepted for either local delivery or relay.
Important: Whenever SMTP AUTH is enabled, your email server is effectively "send only," because mail servers from other domains are most likely not configured to authenticate with your server. This means your local email clients can only receive email from other local clients.

• If both SMTP AUTH and Restricted SMTP Relay are enabled, then hosts on a pre-approved list can relay without authentication, and those not on the list must authenticate via SMTP AUTH.

• If Restricted SMTP Relay is enabled and SMTP AUTH is disabled, then you are protected from being an open relay, while still allowing local delivery of mail from any host. In other words, SMTP hosts that are not in the Restricted SMTP Relay host list cannot relay through your server, but your local clients could still receive email from them.
Note: This is the most common configuration.

Apple Mail Server logs sessions in which there is a failed authentication or an attempt to send mail without authenticating. This is found in Apple Mail Server's activity log, located at /Library/Logs/MailService/AppleMailServer.Server.log. You can read it with the Log Viewer module in the Server Admin application.

SMTP AUTH is not controlled from the Server Admin application. Instead, it is controlled by a few entries in the local NetInfo database. Apple Mail Server creates these entries for you, but it gives them values that disable SMTP AUTH by default. This means that your mail server continues its prior behavior until you intervene.





Steps to set up SMTP AUTH

The following procedure explains how to enable and configure SMTP Authentication, known as "SMTP AUTH," for Apple Mail Server by using the NetInfo Manager application.

Important: This document assumes a basic understanding of NetInfo Manager. If you are familiar with the Terminal, the niutil and kill commands, and process IDs, you may use those instead. See the "Advanced Administrators Only" section below.

1. If you have not already, install the Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 Update and restart the server.
2. Open the Server Admin application.
3. Be sure that MailServer is running.
4. Open NetInfo Manager (/Applications/Utilities/).
5. Navigate to the "config" directory in the local domain, located in the second column after "/".
6. Select the AppleMailServer directory in the next column.
7. Edit the "smtp_plain_login _flag" property by entering the value of "1". This enables SMTP AUTH.
8. Save the new settings and quit NetInfo Manager.
9. Stop and restart Apple Mail Server using Server Admin.
This completes the steps to configure the SMTP AUTH feature. If you need to change the setting, you can repeat this procedure

Client Settings

Email client applications work with SMTP authentication and are configured on a per user, per account basis.

Advanced Administrators Only

You may configure SMTP AUTH in Apple Mail Server using the Terminal.

When the 10.1.3 Apple Mail Server starts up, it creates attributes in local NetInfo that control the behavior of the SMTP AUTH feature. You can edit these values with the niutil command. To view default settings, execute this command as root:

niutil -read . /config/AppleMailServer

The resulting output:

name: AppleMailServer
smtp_plain_login_flag: 0
open_relay_addr_flag: 0
open_relay_addr_list: 17.221.41.168

The IP address is the address of the server on which Apple Mail Server is running. You can enable the SMTP AUTH feature with the following command:

niutil -createprop . /config/AppleMailServer smtp_plain_login_flag 1

These NetInfo settings take effect when a HUP signal is received by the MailService process. To send the HUP signal:

kill -HUP `ps auxc | grep MailService | awk '{print $2}'`


Mac OS X Server: Restricted SMTP Relay Helps Prevent Unsolicited Email

Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 or later offers a Restricted SMTP Relay feature for the Apple Mail Server. This allows the server to accept SMTP relay traffic only from approved hosts or IP addresses, thus to avoid being an open relay for people who send unsolicited email or "spammers."

Restricted SMTP Relay feature to prevent unsolicited email

If you are running the Mail Server feature of a Mac OS X Server that is connected to the Internet, it is essential that you use SMTP restrictions to keep the server from becoming an open relay. An "open relay" is a mail server that allows third parties to send mail to other third parties without authentication. Third parties can find an open relay and use it to send unsolicited email (sometimes called "spam"), and then a variety of spam prevention services will blacklist the open relay. Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 or later includes the Restricted SMTP Relay feature to prevent this. Points to remember:


• Restricted SMTP Relay utilizes a list of hosts (computers) that you trust, such as those on your local area network (LAN). An entry on this list may be a DNS name, an IP address, or a range of IP addresses.

• After this list is created and the feature enabled, the Mail Server loads the host list into a local cache for verification against all incoming SMTP connections. It checks all connections against this list for remote mail delivery regardless of the originating "mail from:" value. Any user who attempts to relay mail from a host not in the approved host list must authenticate via SMTP AUTH, or it will have its mail rejected by the server.

Note: Unless you want your local email clients to have to authenticate via SMTP AUTH, then you do not need to take any additional steps to set up SMTP AUTH. Enabling Restricted SMTP Relay automatically enables SMTP AUTH for hosts not in the host list.

• Whenever SMTP AUTH is enabled, your email server is effectively a "send only" server, because mail servers from other domains are most likely not configured to authenticate with your server. This means your local email clients can only receive email from other local clients.

• If both SMTP AUTH and Restricted SMTP Relay are enabled, then hosts on a pre-approved list can relay and send mail without authentication, and those not on the list must authenticate via SMTP AUTH.

• If Restricted SMTP Relay is enabled and SMTP AUTH is disabled, then you are protected from being an open relay, while still allowing local delivery of mail from any host. In other words, SMTP hosts that are not in the Restricted SMTP Relay host list cannot relay through your server, but your local clients can still receive email from them.

Note: This is the most common configuration.

•A user wishing to relay mail from a non-approved host may do so by using SMTP Authentication (see "Additional Information" below). If you want to assure that your local email users are authenticated when they send email, enable the SMTP Authentication feature.

• Restricted SMTP Relay is not controlled from the Server Admin application. Instead, it is controlled by a few entries in the local NetInfo database. Apple Mail Server creates these entries for you, but it gives them values that disable Restricted SMTP Relay by default. This means that your mail server continues its prior behavior until you intervene.


Mac OS X Server: How to Set up Restricted SMTP Relay for Apple Mail Server

Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 or later offers a Restricted SMTP Relay feature for Apple Mail Server. This document describes how to set it up.

Steps to set up Restricted SMTP Relay

Important:

1. Before proceeding, you should read technical document
"Mac OS X Server: Restricted SMTP Relay Helps Prevent Unsolicited Email"

2. This procedure will not work if you do not complete Step 11.

3. This document assumes a basic understanding of NetInfo Manager. If you are familiar with the Terminal, the niutil and kill commands, and process IDs, you may use those instead. See the "Advanced Administrators Only" section below.
Follow these steps to set up Restricted SMTP Relay:

1. If you have not already, install the Mac OS X Server 10.1.3 Update and restart the server.
2. Open the Server Admin application.
3. Be sure that MailServer is running.
4. Open NetInfo Manager (/Applications/Utilities/).
5. Navigate to the "config" directory in the local domain, located in the second column after "/".
6. Select the AppleMailServer directory in the next column.
7. Edit the "open_relay_addr_flag" property by entering the value of "1". This enables Restricted SMTP Relay.

Important: Next you must edit the "open_relay_addr_list" property, which contains a list of values that may be host names, IP addresses, or IP address ranges from which relaying is allowed. If the Mail Server starts up and these attributes are absent, it creates the attribute open_relay_addr_flag with a value of 0 and the attribute open_relay_addr_list with a value representing the IP address of the local server.

8. To add an additional value to the "open_relay_addr_list" property, choose "New Value" from the "Directory" menu and edit as desired See the "Example values" section below for syntax examples.
9. Save the new settings and quit NetInfo Manager.
10. Stop and restart Apple Mail Server using Server Admin to enact the new settings.
11. Be sure the checkbox is deselected for "Deliver mail to local addresses only (no SMTP relay)" in the Configure Host Settings window of Server Admin. This must be done while Apple Mail Server is running. This allows the server the check the newly created SMTP relay list.

This completes the steps to configure the Restrict SMTP Relay feature. If you need to modify the list of hosts, the procedure can be repeated.

What Restricted SMTP Relay does

Once relay lists have been created and enabled, the Mail Server loads them into a local cache for verification against all incoming SMTP connections. All connections are checked against this list for remote mail delivery regardless of the originating "mail from:" value. Any user who attempts to relay mail from a host not in the approved list will have the message rejected by the server. A user wishing to relay mail from a non-approved host may do so by authenticating via SMTP AUTH (see "Additional Information" below). If you want to assure that your local email users are authenticated when they send email, you can enable the SMTP Authentication ("SMTP AUTH") feature.

The Mail Server reads and processes the open_relay_addr settings in Directory Services when it starts up or after receiving a HUP signal, on the first SMTP session. The ".Server.log" file notes the IP addresses or ranges and the host and domain names added to the valid relay list. Host names that cannot be resolved or malformed address ranges are not added to the relay list. Such a complication would also be noted in the log.

Example values for the host list

A variety of notations can be used for each entry in the open_relay_addr_list. Valid examples include:

* Host Names - myserver.example.com
* Domains - example.com
* Single IP Address - 192.168.123.55
* IP Address Range - 192.168.40.*
("*" represents entire range)
* IP Address Range - 192.168.40-43.0-255
(Ranges explicitly stated)
* IP Address Range: 192.168.40-43.*
(Mixed notation styles)
Advanced Administrators Only

When it starts up, Apple Mail Server creates attributes in local NetInfo that control the behavior of the Restricted SMTP Relay and SMTP AUTH features. You can edit these values in the Terminal with the niutil command.

1. To view default settings, execute this command as root:

niutil -read . /config/AppleMailServer

The resulting output:

name: AppleMailServer
smtp_plain_login_flag: 0
open_relay_addr_flag: 0
open_relay_addr_list: 17.221.41.168

The IP address is the address of the computer on which Apple Mail Server is running. You can enable the Restrict SMTP Relay feature with the following command:

niutil -createprop . /config/AppleMailServer open_relay_addr_flag 1

2. Deselect the checkbox for the "Deliver mail to local addresses only (no SMTP relay)" in the Configure Host Settings window in the Server Admin application (Figure 4). This cannot be achieved from the Terminal.

3. These NetInfo settings take effect when a HUP signal is received by the MailService process. To send the HUP signal:

kill -HUP `ps auxc | grep MailService | awk '{print $2}'`



 
Mac OS X Server 10.1: How to Install on Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) or iMac

Mac OS X Server 10.1: How to Install on Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) or iMac

The Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver 2002) and iMac (Flat Panel) computers come with Mac OS X 10.1.2 or later preinstalled. If you want to install Mac OS X Server on one of these computers, then you must follow the steps listed in this document to ensure proper software installation.

Affected computers
This procedure required for the computers:
• Power Mac G4 (QuickSilver 2002)
These computer models were introduced in 2002-01 with microprocessor speeds of 800 MHz, 933 MHz, and dual 1 GHz.
• iMac (Flat Panel)

How to install
You must initiate installation using the "MacOSXServerInstall.mpkg," or metapackage file, rather than using the "Install Mac OS X Server" application. This assumes that you have already started up the computer and completed the Setup Assistant. If you have not, do so now. Then follow these steps:

1. Start up the computer from the hard disk, as you would for normal use. Do not start up from the installation CD-ROM disc.
2. Insert the Mac OS X Server 10.1 CD into the disc drive.
3. In the Finder, open the Mac OS X Server 10.1 CD and locate the "MacOSXServerInstall.mpkg" file. It is in the path:
/Welcome to Mac OS X Server/MacOSXServerInstall/MacOSXServerInstall.mpkg
4. Double-click the "MacOSXServerInstall.mpkg" file to install the server software.
5. Once the system is set up to access the local network, open the System Preferences application and choose Software Update.
6. Click Update Now to select and install software.
7. Because some software updates are prerequisites for others, you should repeat Step 6 until the computer is fully up to date.

 
Mac OSX House Cleaning Fix
In Terminal

1. Type pwd
2. Type cd /private/etc
3.Type ls
4. Type cat /etc/crontab
(You might want to stetch your window to view it)
5. Type su
6. Type sh /etc/daily
 
“Analyze twice, migrate once!” The key to a successful Mac OSX migration.

“Analyze twice, migrate once!”
The key to a successful Mac OSX migration.


Mac OS X is a modern operating system that combines the power and stability of UNIX with the simplicity and elegance of the Macintosh. With the arrival of Mac OS X comes the possibility of realizing the dream of a single computing platform. UNIX has long been the choice for the servers that organizations depend on. However, in the past UNIX workstations have been too expensive and have suffered from a limited choice of shrink-wrapped applications. With Mac OSX, organizations can have the benefits of UNIX on its servers and workstations and also have a full range of desktop applications to choose from.

Migrating your company to Mac OSX is not your usual migration. You need an expert guide who knows how to get you upgraded without getting lost. HCS Training Centers, Ltd., a leading development, training and solutions company and PWR Systems, have teamed up to offer real-world, hands-on Apple Mac OSX migration strategies. We'll bring uncommon insight to your Mac OS X migration.

When the Mac OS X migration occurs, your resulting environment will simply be the most leveraged, flexible, and well managed IT value today. You will save in workflow costs, support time, and better overall reliability and extensibility.

This plan involves research and analysis to arrive at the optimal approach. It is a collaborative process between skilled senior IT project managers and your internal staff. It combines the thoughtful factoring of the views and needs of the customer with the technical realities of systems.



The key to any successful migration is to plan and then phase-in a system solution. A phased-in approach allows for the least amount of disruption to workflow and productivity.

Discovery:

Review of current environment:
1. Review and document existing workstations, servers, peripherals and network hardware
2. Review and document existing shrink-wrap and custom software applications.
3. Review and document current databases and how they are utilized.
4. Review and document current workflow.
5. Review and document competitive environment factors

Analyze Mac OS X compatibility:
1. Analyze hardware and detail required upgrades.
2. Inventory existing peripherals and document OS X driver status.
3. Analyze network systems and detail required upgrades.
4. Inventory software applications in use and document OS X compatibility.
5. Analyze database utilization and upgrade paths.
6. Analyze workflow and impact of migration to Mac OS X.
7. Develop phased migration plan and schedule

Training:

Human factors are extremely important in OS migrations. Customers tend to want to stay with the familiar, unless they are convinced of the benefits of a new approach.
Here, there may be a mismatch in expectations if an education process is not in place.
Once a migration occurs, users will want the same functionality with the features of the new system. Their ability to receive on-the-job training and guidance becomes key. Education about the Mac OSX client and server platforms needs to occur during the planning phase so that the benefits of the platform can be integrated into the new target platform. This education process will pay dividends in workflow, work output, and ease of use. With this training will come a boost in productivity and improved workflows.

Mac OS X Hands-on Support Course teaches Macintosh administrators the essential concepts, tools, and tasks necessary for managing a Mac OS X system. From installation and configuration to testing and troubleshooting, you will learn how to manage multiple users, preferences, applications, files and privileges, networking, UNIX, security, and troubleshooting. Hands-on exercises provide practical experience as you learn system administration and troubleshooting.

HCS Training Centers, Ltd. and PWR Systems believes with the right amount of preparation and education that the process of migration can be achieved in a straightforward and predictable manner. Our team methodology has been tested for many migrations before. Before an organization begins migration planning, an educational step should occur before the migration plan is adopted

Project Management:

This review is not created in a vacuum, but rather it is a result of the interaction of your management team with a consultant. The problems of ill-defined systems and the lack of integration, will give way to a more streamlined and efficient architecture for the future. Efficient workflow and more cohesiveness of the enterprise are our goal.
Are Your Mac OSX Solutions Fit for Business?
How can you extend your business technology solutions to mobile and remote users?
Do you have a Disaster Recovery solution?
Do you have a Business Continuity solution?

Making Mac OSX Fit for Business. This year businesses and their IT departments are refocusing on basic services and core business objectives. Learn the Mac OSX technology and to see past the "bells and whistles" and feature sets to target core business needs, alignment, and economic justification.

Mac OSX Supports Mobile and Distributed Workforce Cost Effectively. No longer a luxury, today's business requires supporting users in distributed branch offices and on the go. Learn to extend your critical business technology solutions to users in remote offices, at home, or on the road.

Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Solutions. Most businesses have talked from time to time about Disaster Recovery planning, but few have really implemented a plan. Even fewer have taken measures beyond Disaster Recovery to ensure Business Continuity. Learn the difference and learn about products and technologies that will ensure your business can operate in any situation.

 
Policy For Project Management
Policy For Project Management

Overview
Effective project management is crucial to the success of HCS Training Centers, Ltd.

Project management involves the following.

Team management
The project manager needs to develop skills that create an efficient production system and a cooperative and effective team culture.

Communication management
Communication enables interaction between project stakeholders, the development team, the client and senior management.

Risk management
Risk management includes strategies and tactics used to identify and avoid project risks.

Configuration management
This includes a change control procedure and a file naming convention.

Quality management
Quality management includes the activities and techniques used to ensure that all project activities and work products comply with all relevant standards, procedures and requirements.

Time management
Project time management includes the processes and techniques used to ensure the timely completion of the project.

Cost management
Project cost management includes the processes used to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget.


Team management
Team management includes all the processes that will be engaged to identify, secure and maintain an effective project team.

The Team management plan may include sections on these topics:

Staffing
When, how and from where project staff will be obtained, assigned to and taken off the project team.

Team structure
Team roles and responsibilities.

Team communication
How and when the team will communicate including meetings, minutes, email, individual work documentation, project documentation.

Team building
The activities to be performed by management and team members, as a group or individually, to improve team performance.

Conflict resolution
The procedures for resolving conflict between team members, and between the team and other project stakeholders.

Performance appraisals
The techniques and activities that will be used to review group and individual performance.

Training
The formal and informal activities that will be undertaken to enhance the skills and knowledge of the project team.

A successful team unleashes tremendous synergy and become far greater than the sum of its parts. The difference between successful and unsuccessful project performance can often be linked to the effectiveness of the team process. This includes the processes that transform a group of people into an effective team as well as the continuous activities throughout the project that maintain and support the team and the team skills of members.

Communication management
Communication management includes the techniques and activities (processes, format, frequency and quality) that will be used to meet the reporting and communication requirements of all project stakeholders. Effective reporting and communication will ensure that the stakeholders gain and maintain a clear understanding of the products, the methods, and responsibilities aiding or inhibiting the project, and the project's progress.

The communication strategy may include weekly project team meetings and weekly project status reports that communicate project progress (including risks, schedule and budget status) to project stakeholders and to the development team, client and senior management.


Risk management
Risk management includes strategies and tactics that will be used to identify, and avoid or mitigate the project risks throughout the life cycle of a project. This may be a self-contained risk management plan on large or risky projects or may be a section or appendix of the project plan.

Risks generally come from three principal sources:

Business risks
Risks originating from the client and the target environment.

Project risks
Risks originating from the team and the team environment of these actions.

Technical risks
Risks originating from the system complexity, and other aspects of the technology and environment of application.
A common strategy for risk management is to use a matrix, the top ten risk matrix, in which the team documents the top ten risk factors; rates these risks ( high, medium or low), identifies and documents mitigation strategies, and tracks progress of these strategies.

Configuration management
Each project component is produced in various stages or versions. A significant challenge is to ensure that you can identify each component, as well as different versions of the same component, to ensure that different 'builds' of the product incorporate the right version of the components.

This is achieved through effective configuration management, which includes a change control procedure and a file naming convention. The configuration management procedures and techniques are determined as part of project plan development during the definition phase and are carried out as an ongoing project management activities.
The configuration plan aims to establish and maintain the integrity of all the work products of the project.

This plan lists the items of the project that have been placed under configuration management documents how changes to these items will be controlled, recorded and reported documents how the items will be audited to verify conformance to requirements.
All project documentation, project hardware and software, and project outputs should be placed under configuration management. A configuration and change control log can be used to log all changes to the controlled items. This log might record fields such as:

date
recorded by
requested by
product and component
comments
recommendation
action
authorized by
action taken
result.

Quality management
Quality management includes the activities and techniques used to ensure that all project activities and work products comply with all relevant standards, procedures and requirements. Evaluation and testing activities will contribute to overall quality of the package but do not constitute the whole quality management process.

The quality of a package is a function of its planning – it is not enough to inspect a package at its completion to ensure it is bug free. Quality planning ensures that quality is of continuing concern.

There are a number of elements that you can plan for and these are related to procedural issues as well as deliverable products. A quality management plan should be developed as part of the project plan during the definition phase.

Quality assurance
Quality assurance requires evaluating project performance on a regular basis to ensure that the standards specified in the planning stage are being met. Some evaluation and testing procedures will be included here.

Quality control
Quality control involves monitoring individual aspects of the project to establish whether they comply with the standards specified in the planning phase. If not, a procedure will be specified to improve the faulty performance.

Quality improvement
Quality improvement also requires planning. You should aim to factor-in time to plan for future projects or procedures, with an aim to improving those packages and procedures. A debrief at the end of projects can raise issues to be addressed in the next project's Quality Management Plan.

Responsibilities
It will be necessary to specify a team member who will be responsible for coordinating the quality management process. As will be clear from the items listed above, quality management needs to be a part of the culture of the team, and is an on-going process. How the ownership of any role in the process is nominated will have to be decided by the team.

Steps in quality planning can include:

Specifying all requirements you expect the package to meet. (These definitions should include procedural definitions, product definitions and desired outcomes. They will be iteratively defined over the phases of Initiation, Definition, Specification and design)

Identifying which quality standards are relevant to the project and determining how to satisfy them. (For example, when specifying performance requirements, make sure media quality meets the needs of the user. Quality standards will be iteratively defined over the phases of Initiation, Definition, Specification and design)

Specify a means by which to measure performance of all the criteria. (These will be specified in the evaluation and testing plan)

Assigning team members to test small sections of the package and process, and to evaluate each section's performance.

Assigning ownership to problems and develop a procedure to track resolutions adding quality assurance checking times into your milestones having team debriefs where future performance objectives can be planned

Time management
Project time management includes the processes and techniques used to ensure the timely completion of the project. It involves the development and management of the project work activities and the project schedule. As part of project planning in the definition phase, a detailed project schedule and work breakdown structure should be developed based on the proposals contained in the scope document and agreed to in the project contract.

As the project activities progress, you will see differences between planned and actual duration of activities begin to emerge. You will need to monitor and control changes to the schedule of activities as well as to the overall project. Changes are made and communicated according to the project change control procedures and as agreed to with the client and other stakeholders.

On small projects, the processes of sequencing, estimating and schedule development may be viewed and conducted as a single process. On larger projects, these may be quite distinct and the skills and resources applied to these processes may be vital for the project's success.

Cost management
Project cost management includes the processes used to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget. The resources and budget required for the project are proposed in the scope document and agreed to in the project contract. This is further detailed as part of project planning in the definition phase. The contract should set the points for review of the project budget (and project schedule). Budget and schedule reviews are necessary especially when the requirements, design and content of the product are going to be iteratively defined.

In all subsequent project phases and after each development cycle, cost management involves the confirmation of resources (people, equipment and materials) and estimation of the budget needed to complete project activities for the phase/cycle. As the project activities progress, you will probably see differences between planned and actual costs emerge and you will need to monitor and control changes to the cost of activities and stages of development, and to monitor their impact on the overall project budget. Changes to the budget are performed and communicated according to the project change control procedures and as agreed to with the client and other stakeholders.

On small projects, the processes of determining resources, estimating and budgeting cost may be viewed and conducted as a single process. On larger projects, these may be quite distinct and the skills and resources applied to these processes may be vital for the project's success. Although project cost management is primarily concerned with the cost of the resources needed to complete project activities, you may need to also consider the effect of project decisions on the eventual cost of using the project product. Certain design decisions or limited testing may result in increased cost to the end user's operating costs.

Respectfully yours,

Craig Cohen
President

 
Fixing Mac OS X Server Mail Database
Fixing Mac OS X Server Mail Database

Mac OS X Server: How and When to Use repairDB for Mail Database Maintenance
In some situations, you may need to use the repairDB (mail database repair) utility.

Under most circumstances, the Mac OS X Server mail server automatically detects mail database issues and automatically runs repairDB to correct them. In some situations, the issues are not detected and repairDB does not run automatically.
To run repairDB:

1. Stop Mail Service using Server Admin.
2. Open Terminal (/Applications/Utilities/).
3. At the prompt, type:
sudo /usr/sbin/MailService -repairDB
4. Press Return.
5. Enter your Admin user password.
6. Press Return.
The repairDB utility runs. The status of the utility is reported in:


/Library/Logs/MailService/AppleMailServer.Repair.log
Upon completion of the database repair the following lines appears in AppleMailServer.Repair.log:

--- Finished mail database recovery --- Closing the new mail database
Now, you need to kill the MailService process and restart mail service:

1. At the prompt, type: top
2. Press Return.
3. In the resulting list, locate the process ID (PID) of the MailService process.
4. Press the "Q" to leave top and get a new prompt.
5. Type: kill
Note: Where the example says "", type only the actual number, for example, "kill 123".
6. Press Return.
7. In Server Admin, restart mail service

 
Apple Software Ports
Apple Software Ports


TCP Port Service
7 echo RFC 792
20 FTP data RFC 959
21 FTP control RFC 959
22 ssh (secure shell)
23 Telnet RFC 854
25 SMTP (email) RFC 821
53 DNS RFC 1034, MacDNS
79 Finger RFC 1288
80 HTTP (Web) RFC 2068, iTools, Sherlock, QuickTime Installer
88 Kerberos RFC 1510
106 PASS
110 POP3 (email) RFC 1081, APOP
111 Remote Procedure Call (RPC) RFC 1057, Portmap (sunrpc)
113 AUTH RFC 931
115 sftp
119 NNTP (news) RFC 977
123 Network Time Server synchronization
139 Windows file and print (SMB) RFC 100
143 IMAP (email access) RFC 2060
311 AppleShare IP remote Web administration
389 LDAP (directory) RFC 2251, Sherlock 2 LDAP search
427 SLP (service location)
443 SSL (HTTPS)
514 shell
515 LPR (printing) RFC 1179
532 netnews
548 AFP (AppleShare, File Sharing, Apple File Service), iDisk
554 Real-Time Streaming Protocol (QTSS) RFC 2326
600-1023 Mac OS X RPC-based services (for "example," NetInfo)
626 IMAP Administration (Mac OS X Server and AppleShare IP 6)
660 Server Admin (both AppleShare IP and Mac OS X Server)
687 AppleShare IP Shared Users and Groups
2236 Macintosh Manager
7070 Real-Time Streaming Protocol (QTSS)
8000-8999 Web service
16080 Web service with performance cache
24000-24999 Web service with performance cache

SPACER

UDP Port Service
7 echo
53 DNS
67 DHCP server (BootP)
68 DHCP client
69 TrivialFile Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
111 Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
123 Network Time Protocol
137 Windows Name Service (WINS)
138 Windows Datagram Service, Windows Network Neighborhood
161 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
427 SLP (service location)
497 Retrospect
513 who
514 Syslog
554 Real-Time Streaming Protocol (QTSS)
600-1023 Mac OS X RPC-based services (for "example," NetInfo)
2049 Network File System (NFS)
3283 Apple Network Assistant, Apple Remote Desktop
6970 and up QTSS
7070 Real-Time Streaming Protocol alternate (QTSS)


Notes:


1. In Mac OS X Server 10.0.3 and later, some services that do not use well-known ports register with portmap. You may use the rpcinfo -p command in Terminal to see what is registered with portmap.

2. The NetInfo parent-child model has replaced Shared Users and Groups in Mac OS X Server 10.0.3 and later.

3. Remote Admin on port 311 has been removed in Mac OS X Server 10.0.3 and later.

4. With performance cache enabled in Mac OS X Server 10.0.3 and later, Apache is on port 16080 and cache is on port 80.

 
Suggested Process for Creating Aqua Icons
Suggested Process for Creating Aqua Icons


You need to provide at least the following files:
• a 128 by 128 image (for Finder icons)
• a mask that defines the image's edges, so the operating system can determine which regions are clickable

Icons that display in the Finder are viewed at different sizes: they can be magnified in the Dock, they can be previewed at full size, and users can specify a preferred size. For the best-looking icons at all sizes, you should also provide customized image files ("hints") at three other sizes: 64 x 64, 32 x 32, and 16 x 16. Although the Dock doesn't use hints (it uses a sophisticated algorithm on the 128 x 128 version), hints are important for preserving crucial details in Finder icons.

If you are creating an icon that will never change size—on a bevel button, for example—you can supply the image only at actual size.

Here are the suggested steps for creating an icon:
1. Sketch the icon.
2. Create a software illustration of the icon.
3. Add detail and color.
4. Add shadows.
5. In an image-editing program, manipulate the image to get precise effects and create the icon mask.
6. Convert the icon to a .icns file. You can complete this step with Icon Composer, included on the Mac OS X Developer Tools CD. There are also several third-party tools available for completing this step.


 
Mac OS X 10.1: How to Connect to an SMB Volume (Microsoft Windows)
Mac OS X 10.1: How to Connect to an SMB Volume (Microsoft Windows)


Mac OS X does not display the names of SMB servers in the Connect to Server dialog. However, you may connect to them by following these steps. In the address field of the Connect to Server dialog, type the URL using this syntax:
smb://ServerName/ShareName/

After you click connect, you will be prompted for the workgroup, user name, and password.
Notes:
1. "ServerName" may be an IP address or DNS name.
2. The name of the "share" (the shared disk, volume, or directory) must be specified. You will not be prompted for it.
3. The name of the share cannot contain spaces.
4. Connecting to (mounting) two or more SMB volumes simultaneously may cause a kernel panic. Drag one volume to the Trash to eject it before connecting to another.
5. The only alert message that Mac OS X displays for SMB login difficulties is "There's no file service available at the URL ." This is sometimes correct and sometimes incorrect. This is the message that would appear if you mistyped your password, for example.
6. Mac OS X connects to SMB via the TCP/IP protocol, not via the NetBIOS protocol.
7. When troubleshooting a connection failure, you can ping the IP address of the Windows computer using the Mac OS X Network Utility to verify a TCP/IP connection between the two computers.


 
Typing ">console" as a username at the login window
Typing ">console" as a username at the login window takes you straight to a full-screen login shell, if for some reason you need to avoid Aqua but don't want to reboot for single-user mode.

 
"AppleSystemProfiler" dumps
Typing "AppleSystemProfiler" dumps Apple System Profiler data to the console. A clever Mac tech I know at an Apple reseller uses this in single-user mode (Cmd-S on startup) to verify RAM upgrades on new systems without getting sucked into Apple's automatic registration app. If that's just too many letters for you to type, take advantage of command completion: A (tab) S (tab) (return)

 
Deleting Files Owned By Root
There are several ways to delete a file owned by root:
1. in terminal "sudo rm filename" - which prompts for an admin password - the user you are logged in as must be an administrator. This is the preferred way.

2. log on as root - provided root login is enabled in NetInfo Manager. And YES, you CAN actually log on as root in the login panel, if "Show 'Other User'..." is enabled in the Login Pref Panel. ***This is NOT advised***

3. in terminal "su root" & enter the root password. Then "rm filename" in the appropriate directory. ***This is NOT advised, either***

4. boot into single user mode and "rm filename" at the command prompt. ***I shouldn't have to say it***

 
Mac OS X: Login To Servers At Start Up
Open the TextEdit application and type in the following:

afp://username:password@server.domain.com/volume

Or if you prefer...

afp://username:password@ip.address/volume

Then select the text and drag it to your Desktop. You now get a location file with the suffix .afploc. You can change the name of this file as you see fit and place the file anywhere on your hard drive.

Now simply go to the Login menu and drag this location file to the login window and viola.

I haven't yet been able to figure out how to get this to work for volumes that require a username but no password.


Powered by Blogger